Mar 152011
 

wedding processional music, modern wedding processional music, wedding processional music suggestions, contemporary wedding processional music, non traditional wedding processional music“Here comes the bride…big, fat, and wide!”  And there you have one big reason to go with non traditional wedding processional music instead of the standard wedding processional music you hear at just about every wedding.  Still, if that is and always has been your dream, you should do what you want.  It is, after all, YOUR wedding and it should be exactly as you have pictured it your entire life.  So, let’s break down your processional songs, where they go, their purposes, and some wedding processional music suggestions understanding that there are traditional songs (what you probably picture hearing at a wedding), non traditional (still typically classical but off the beaten path), and modern or contemporary (songs you might hear on the radio).

wedding processional music, modern wedding processional music, wedding processional music suggestions, contemporary wedding processional music, non traditional wedding processional musicProcessional One:  The Parent’s

Mom, Dad, Grandma and Grandpa.  These are just a few of the elder folk that may walk down to this song.  This song will typically start off your wedding proper.  As for music, consider what your parents will want to walk down the aisle to.  You, of course, should always have final say, but if their feelings are taken into consideration, it will be a positive all around.  Listen to their ideas and if they fit, there’s no reason why you shouldn’t use what they desire. Even if it isn’t your favorite music, remember that, as a bride, you will most likely not hear this song anyway, since you will be hidden in back with Dad for the bridal march.  Traditional: Canon in D, Where Sheep May Safely Graze, Jesu, Joy Of Man’s Desiring.  Nontraditional: Con TI Partiro, Ave Maria, Flower Duet.  Modern: When I Fall In Love (romantic), Still The One by Orleans (fast and fun!).

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Processional Two: The Bridesmaids

Your bridesmaids, who love you because you didn’t make them dress up like fluffy cupcakes and instead put them in dresses they can actually wear again (was I too heavy on the hint there?) will be walking down to their song.  Now, you do have some options, including having the groomsmen walk out from the side to this song first or having them escort the bridesmaids.  Also, the kids, i.e. the flower girls and ring bearer, enter at the end of this same song–or they can have their own song.   Maybe I’m confusing you.  All of this, and so many other options, are covered in the Wedding Songs Timeline Planner, so I should hold off on getting too detailed here.  Traditional: Canon in D, Jesu,  Prelude #1 in C Major by Bach, and more.  Non traditional: Serenade to Spring, Air On A G String, and more.  Contemporary: St. Elmo’s Fire, Wishing and Hoping by Ani DiFranco, Any new “girly” song.

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wedding processional music, modern wedding processional music, wedding processional music suggestions, contemporary wedding processional music, non traditional wedding processional musicProcessional Three:  The Bride

This is the bride and her dad, or mom and dad, or any other special person that fits–or the bride alone.  Again, if your vision means walking down to the Wedding March (Here Comes The Bride), you should do so.  Keep in mind, there is a traditional recessional that is also called the Wedding March, so don’t confuse the two.  I explain the differences in the WSTP.  Traditional: The Wedding March by Wagner.  Non traditional: Any of the previous traditional or non traditional songs mentioned earlier.  Contemporary: Waiting On An  Angel by Ben Harper, From This Moment On by Shania Twain,  just about any love song will do!

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As you can see, you have a gazillion options regarding your wedding processional music.  You have a lot of decisions to make.  Whether you are looking for your traditional songs that are wedding standards or you want to have more modern wedding processional music, in this day and age, you can do just about anything.  Keep in mind that if you want to use contemporary wedding processional music, your church might have restrictions.  There are some officiants (pastors, ministers, etc.) who are sticklers for tradition and may have a major meltdown if the bride walks down the aisle to a Lenny Kravitz song.

For the most up to date wedding music and ideas along with step by step planning, the Wedding Songs Timeline Planner is an inexpensive option that can give you the peace of mind you need, knowing you are not missing anything crucial for your ceremony and processional music.

wedding planning, wedding planning tips, wedding planner, wedding planning book, wedding songs, wedding music, great wedding ideasGetting help:  Shopping for a dress and getting Maggie Sottero prices on your potential wedding gown, finding the perfect style to go along with your tiaras for wedding looks, keeping in tradition with fall wedding colors or whatever season you are in, and seeing that the groom chooses the right tuxedos for weddings are things to get help with in your wedding planner book.  After the wedding, you can worry about changing your name after marriage, but for now, picking out music is a big deal, whether it’s the wedding first dance songs or your ceremony music.  This is why I’m here!  I hope I’ve helped.

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